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Agenda

  • 09:00 - 09:30

    Registration

    Register at the conference and grab a refreshment

  • 09:30 - 10:00

    Keynote

    The keynote will be confirmed soon

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Workshop 1

    Choose one of the workshops from the programme to attend. These are listed on each of the tabs

  • 11:10 - 11:30

    Coffee break

    Grab some refreshments and use this time for networking or browsing our exhibitors

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Workshop 2

    Choose one of the workshops from the programme to attend. These are listed on each of the tabs

  • 12:35 - 14:00

    Lunch

    Grab some refreshments and use this time for networking or browsing our exhibitors

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    Workshop 3

    Choose one of the workshops from the programme to attend. These are listed on each of the tabs

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    Workshop 4

    Choose one of the workshops from the programme to attend. These are listed on each of the tabs

  • 16:15 - 16:45

    Keynote & closing

    The closing session will be delivered by Professor Miles Berry. Miles is Professor of Computing Education at the University of Roehampton. Prior to joining Roehampton, he spent 18 years in four schools, much of the time as an ICT coordinator and most recently as a head teacher. He is chair of England's National Centre for Computing Education' academic board and a member of Computing At School's board. He is a fellow of the BCS, HEA and Chartered College of Teaching, and served on CSTA's board as international representative 2016-2020. Over the years he has contributed to a number of computing related projects including the national curriculum computing programmes of study, Switched on Computing, Barefoot Computing, QuickStart Computing, CAS TV, Project Quantum, Hello World, AI4K12 and the Royal Society's Mathematical Futures project.

Workshop 1

Choose 1 of the following sessions to attend

These are offered on a first-come first-served basis when signing up for your ticket so get your tickets now to secure your space!

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Taking Perspective: Spatial Skills in Computing

    Jack Parkinson , Glasgow University

    Spatial skills have been well established - if not well telegraphed - as being valuable skills for success in many STEM fields, including computing. But why? Why does the ability to rotate a shape in your head make you good at planning out programs, or learning new languages? In this workshop, we will discuss what spatial skills are, how they are valuable to computing and how we can make the most of this interesting yet somewhat strange relationship. There will be Lego!

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Hack Attack: Computational Thinking Unplugged

    Alan O'Donohue , Exa

    An interactive workshop combining cybersecurity and Computational Thinking through an engaging role playing game (unplugged). Suitable for ages 8 and older, this workshop fosters computational thinking, logical deduction, and problem-solving skills in an engaging, no-equipment activity. Act as cyber detectives, collaborate to identify threat actors, and develop cybersecurity terminology. Participants will gain insights to inspire students while having a blast!

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Sphero - take on the mighty Minotaur

    Jo Hodge & Donna Rawling

    Do you have the courage to take on the mighty Minotaur! Then join us for a fun, cross-curricular Sphero session linked to the Greeks. Learn about the different functions of the mini-Sphero and how you could use it in your school.

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Barefoot - new resources

    Isabella Lieghio , BCS

    Join us for an exciting Barefoot workshop where you'll have the opportunity to discover our latest resources. Explore our new AI activities for KS2, designed to enhance computational thinking skills in engaging ways. We will also be introducing an innovative project that links programming with scientific enquiry, and a great new tool designed to enhance your use of Barefoot resources. Don't miss this opportunity to enhance your teaching practice.

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    The future for teaching programming at secondary level

    Richard Pawson , Computer Science from the Metal Up

    In recent years there has been much innovation in the teaching of programming in primary schools, but the way we teach programming in secondary schools has hardly changed in the last 40 years! In this workshop I will be exploring several new practical ideas that would deepen pupils understanding of the fundamental principles of programming, while also making them easier to learn – and are all compatible with the existing GCSE and A-level specifications. Much of the session will consist of live demonstrations of applying these ideas in practice, using radical new tools that you not have seen before. You might not agree with all of my ideas, but if you are a secondary school Computer Science teacher, I guarantee that you will find the session both challenging and rewarding.

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Simplified Online Safety for the Early Years Foundation Stage

    Rachel Coultart , St Nicholas CoE Primary School

    Simplified Online Safety for the Early Years Foundation Stage… top tips for delivering online safety to our youngest learners and ideas for supporting parents in this venture. It’s never too early to start laying the foundations for good digital citizenship and developing the skills for navigating digital life, but what might this actually look like in the Early Years classroom? In this workshop, Rachael shares ideas from her own practice and explores resources that she has found useful for supporting parents.

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Experience AI: AI Resources for KS3

    Ben Garside , Raspberry Pi

    Ben Garside will present the work he has been doing over the past 18 months in developing his understanding of AI education and some of the research and design principles that went into the design of an introductory unit of work on AI for KS3 called Experience AI. Specifically, the session will cover a framework called SEAME, looking at progression across the key stages, research into practice on anthropomorphisation and semantic waves and the key concept of data-driven vs rule-based approaches to program design.

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Computing clusters - collaborative school improvement in computing

    Dave Gibbs , NCCE

    fully funded by the DfE and other partners, Computing Clusters are a high-impact collaborative programme bringing together groups of schools aiming to provide an excellent computing education. Supported by experienced computing educators, participating schools can access benchmarking and action planning tools; professional development workgroups putting research into practice; coaching for inexperienced subject leaders; and support to implement NCCE CPD in the classroom

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Computing Pedagogies for Autistic Learners

    Selina Shah , Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham University

    The workshop will feature the presentation of findings from a research project in the UK, which has formulated a versatile and pragmatic framework for educators. This framework encompasses a variety of computing pedagogies tailored for teaching and learning computing, specifically designed for students with autism. Attendees will actively engage in hands-on activities to explore pedagogical approaches that effectively engage and support autistic learners in computing education.

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Teacher research projects

    Sue Sentance , University of Cambridge

    In this session teachers from around the UK will present on action research projects that they have undertaken in their classrooms over the past year, supported by the TICE2 project. They have some very interesting insights to share that may be very relevant for your own classroom! You may also be interested if you have been thinking about carrying out your own action research project.

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Cisco NetAcad - it isn't just Networking

    Andrew Smith , Open University

    Explore with the Open University and Cisco, how NetAcad can be used for free! This session is for secondary and FE, and will cover how you can use Cyber, Networking, Coding, Operating Systems and basic skills at no cost, with your students!

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Computing for all at KS4

    Pete Dring , Fulford School

    How can we increase recruitment, diversity and accessibility without compromising results in GCSE Computer Science? What works well at KS4 for those who don't choose GCSE CS? What clubs and competitions stretch and support students without overloading staff? Join Pete Dring (Head of Computing, Fulford School, York) to explore some resources, ideas and approaches that attempt to answer these questions.

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    GCSE Computer Science – Which exam board should I choose?

    Join us for this session where we’ll be joined by OCR, AQA & Edexcel to give an overview of the GCSE specifications and allow you to ask questions. This is great for those who are planning to introduce GCSE CS or for those considering moving to another exam board.

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Physical Computing & Nature

    Michael Jones , Northfleet Technology College

    Michael will be showcasing materials and ideas which can be used to apply computer science to carbon capture. The end goals of the workshop are to know how to code a solution for calculating the carbon stored in trees. The journey will take you through the use of trigonometry to measure tall objects, collection of data, application of formula and consideration of moral responsibility as a scientist - computer focused or other. Michael will provide a scheme of work voted as a winner in the 2023 Climate Change Challenge at COP28. His work on sustainability and the use of technology resulted in the award of the Zayed Sustainability Prize at COP28. Bring a right-angled triangle and a calculator!

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Using physical computing to teach logic gates

    Tina Fountain , Rishworth School

    A hands-on session, using the Raspberry Pi, pico to teach the practical applications of logic and logic gates. During the session, we will build a logic gate circuit and look at ways in which we can mimic real life systems to bring to life logic gates.

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Intro to OOP … Or …. Why Everything is an Object

    Dave Hartley , Bitwise Computing

    Object Oriented Programming (or OOP) is the most commonly used paradigm in the software industry. Games, Finance, Engineering, Cybersecurity and more take this approach. Why? In this session, you will Find out Why OOP is central to the software we build today Learn about the foundation concepts of encapsulation, inheritance, classes, methods, and properties Have a go at designing objects to solve a problem And maybe even get to some coding The goal of this session is to demystify the topic, sell you on why its cool, and give you resources to help you teach it.

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Esports

    Tom Dore , British Esports

    Esports is classified as organised, competitive video gaming and is a massive global industry that you may not know much about, but your students definitely will! British Esports is the UK’s national body for esports and supports the UK esports ecosystem from grassroots, community esports through to facilitating national teams to represent GB in international events such as Olympic Esports Week and the Global Esports Games. Tom Dore and Kalam Neale are both ex-teachers and will introduce you to the esports industry and explain why CAS members should be looking seriously at it. They will talk about the British Esports Student Champs, an esports tournament that currently has 600 school teams competing online each week, plus the L2 & L3 BTECs in Esports they have written for Pearson. They will also highlight the explicit, relevant links between esports and STEM, Digital and Creative Media and the range of transferable skills young people develop through participation in this team-based activity. The video game industry is worth more on an annual basis than the film and music industry combined. The tech-based education and career pathways available in the industry and wider, linked digital and creative industries are significant and will only grow. Find out how you can use esports to engage a wider demographic of students and support them to follow their gaming passions.

  • 10:10 - 11:10

    Creative imedia - a viable alternative?

    Jennie Eyres , Eyres Training & Media

    At KS4 teachers often wonder what the alternative is to Computer Science or IT for those who can't access the subjects or who are more interested in using technology than programming. coding and theory. Jennie Eyres will introduce the Cambridge National in Creative imedia as a possible alternative course for those students. 

Workshop 2

Choose 1 of the following sessions to attend

These are offered on a first-come first-served basis when signing up for your ticket so get your tickets now to secure your space!

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Getting Started with the micro:bit

    Nicholas Hughes , The Raglan School

    In this session you will get hands-on experience with the micro:bit. You will: Learn how to create a program. Learn about micro:bit classroom. Learn about some of the resources available to help you teach.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Ocado resources

    Laura Cumming , Ocado

    Code for Life offers FREE games and resources to help teach programming aspects of the national curriculum to secondary-aged students. We have a suite of lesson plans, editable slides, videos, assessment sheets and worksheets that can be used alongside our two games suitable for KS1-4. Our resources are designed for all teachers including those that don’t have a background in Computer Science, and they are aligned to the English National Curriculum. We don’t hide anything behind a paywall, everything is free to registered teachers and homeschooled students. The first game, Rapid Router starts by introducing the programming concepts of sequence, selection and iteration through block-based coding but ultimately transitions to programming in Python. We start by using a split screen displaying the equivalent Python to show the students how the computer reads the blocks, and what they will need to use. Once this has been understood, the blocks are taken away and pupils code further levels using Python. Throughout all levels, students are presented with both an algorithm and route score to ensure they really work at the efficiency of their solutions. After completing the Python section in Rapid Router, there is our second game, Kurono. This is a multiplayer game where students control their avatars in the same game environment using Python commands. We have 4 planned lessons with worksheets and more in the pipeline. We will also be sharing our brand new Python lessons which go from “Hello World” to iteration, so far. They include some Rapid Router levels but also make use of the Raspberry Pi online code editor for programming lessons in pure Python. We have created free editable lesson plans, presentations and worksheets to support these lessons. This project is currently at Beta stage and we would welcome feedback from teachers and students, should you wish to sign up to trial them. This workshop will be an opportunity to see the tools in action and ask questions about how it could fit in with your teaching.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Building a Foundation in Early Years

    James Fraser , Eat Sleep ICT Repeat

    In this workshop, James Fraser will share a range of curriculum resources he uses in his EYFS lessons that build a foundation of computing skills to prepare pupils for Key Stage 1 and beyond.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Teaching programming with LLMs

    Aidan Weston & Veronica Cucuiat , Long Road Sixth Form College & Raspberry Pi

    This workshop explores the use of LLMs for teaching programming. Specifically, we explore the use of LLMs to explain programming error messages. First, Veronica Cucuiat, a Research Scientist at the Raspberry Pi Foundation, will describe the findings from a research project on secondary school educators' views of using LLM to explain programming error messages in classrooms. Next, Aidan Weston, teacher at Long Road Sixth Form College, will present examples of using LLMs to explain programming error messages with his A Level students. Finally, the pedagogical implications of using LLMs to teach programming will be discussed, in view of feedback literacy general education theory.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Crafting with Code, a creative computing workshop

    Margaret Low & Wil Baker , Warwick University

    This cross-curricular project involves programming, maths, design and technology using TurtleStitch (www.turtlestitch.org) TurtleStitch is freely available software that enables the generation and stitching of patterns using a digital embroidery machine. It gives programmatic control of the machine, enabling a wide range of patterns to be designed and stitched onto fabric. Its suitable for primary (years 5, 6) and secondary school students, and appeals to all ages. This workshop will give an introduction to the software and hardware, and participants will have the opportunity to create a pattern and to have it stitched by an embroidery machine, in the classroom. We’ll share the free resources we’ve created, which include tutorial videos, worksheets and lesson plans. We’ll also bring examples of the work done by children in the classroom.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Technocamps: Transforming Digital Education

    Farron Moller , Swansea University

    By 2000, it became evident that, in Wales, interest in, knowledge of, and capacity for computing was not keeping pace with the transformational rise of the digital society and economy. Technocamps, a pan-Wales school and community outreach unit established at Swansea University but with a hub in every university in Wales, has throughout this time researched, championed and delivered change in national curricula, qualifications, delivery and professional development in order to foster a sustainable digital skills pipeline in Wales. In this presentation, we highlight the activities and impact of Technocamps, showcasing its wider impact on computing education, practitioners, schools, and learners in Wales, especially with the introduction of the new Curriculum for Wales in September 2022, with its major reform of computer science and cross-curricular digital competencies.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    I belong - creating the right conditions for girls to succeed in computer science

    - , NCCE

    The 'I Belong...' programme from NCCE comprises an evidence-based, highly effective approach to boosting female participation and achievement in computer science GCSE. Find out how you and your school can get involved in this vital mission, gaining recognition for your commitment to equity and opportunity for all.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Variation theory: An efficient way to help make difficult topics stick

    William Lau , The Children’s Hospital School at Great Ormond Street and UCH

    "I've taught this so many times; why don't they get it?" That's a question that we have all asked ourselves at some point in our career. That's a question that we have all asked ourselves at some point in our career. Running interventions at lunchtime, after school and on Saturdays cannot be the only answer! Variation theories were proposed by Ference Marton and Gu Ling Yuan and these have been widely used in Maths teaching for over 20 years. Yet most computing teacher training programs do not talk about variation theory at all. This session aims to introduce secondary computing teachers to variation theory to help their pupils become more fluent in the most challenging parts of our curriculum.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Using ML activities with Scratch in your Code Club

    Jody Carter , Raspberry Pi

    In this workshop, you will learn about the Code Club environment and how it can be used to nurture a wide variety of digital making skills, while growing learners confidence and independence in coding. Through a fun, practical, step-by-step activity using basic machine learning and Scratch, you’ll sample our resources that are available to use in your Code Club space.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Building advanced database skills to meet the demands of the A-level NEA

    Alex Parry , Raspberry Pi Foundation

    In this practical session, you will explore Ada's embedded SQL editor, engaging with a new database scenario and related project resources. The session is designed to familiarise students with more advanced concepts crucial for achieving higher grades in non-examined assessments.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    PRIMMing the Micro:Bit in the KS3 Curriculum

    Mark Weddell , City of London School for Girls

    A practical workshop showing how the MicroBit can be integrated into the KS3 classroom using PRIMM pedagogy to develop understanding of Selection, Logic, Loops and Subroutines. From Johann Sebastian Joust to developing algorithms on LEDs with Zip Halos and Tiles.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Teaching data representation with RP2040 Pico

    Tina Fountain , Rishworth School

    A hands-on session where you will experiment with sampling sound using the low-cost RP2040 Pico and Micropython. In the experiment you will be able to adjust sample, frequency and explore the impact on the sound and file sizes. The aim is to provide participants with the skills, knowledge, and confidence to implement some hands-on Pico experiments back in their classrooms. experiments Participants will need access to Thonny or another IDE supporting Pico and Micropython. All other hardware will be provided for the session.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    A-Level Computer Science – Which exam board should I choose?

    - , OCR & AQA

    Join us for this session where we’ll be joined by OCR & AQA to give an overview of the A-Level specifications and allow you to ask questions. This is great for those who are planning to introduce A-Level CS or for those considering moving to another exam board.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Getting started with Interactive 3D with inclusion from the start

    Rebecca Franks & Dr Tracy Gardner , Flip Computing

    Flip Computing will guide educators to get started with modern tools for creating interactive 3D worlds. Tools used in industry are surprisingly accessible to educators and young people if you know how to get started. We’ll bridge from computing concepts that you are familiar with to the features of Blender and the UEFN editor from Epic Games. We’ll also provide a taster of the Verse programming language used by UEFN and developed for the future of the metaverse and web3. It’s crucial that young people from underrepresented groups do not get left behind with new technology. Flip Computing takes an inclusion-first approach and we’ll provide guidance for introducing these technologies in an equitable manner.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Generative AI and Computing Education

    Miles Berry , Roehampton University

    Miles explores approaches to teaching pupils about how large language models (LLMs) work. He explores how teachers can move beyond general uses of LLMs to specific applications to support computing and education. He considers how pupils could make use of ChatGPT and Copilot in programming and other computing work, and potential risks of their doing so. He concludes with a discussion of the implications of LLMs for software development, CS education and education more broadly.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Technical and Vocational Qualification Reform - what does this mean for post-16 computing?

    Mark Campbell , Ada College for Digital Skills

    Dive deep into the evolving Level 3 (16-19) qualification landscape and its implications for computing courses in this interactive workshop. Explore the Digital T-Levels and emerging Alternate Academic Qualifications (AAQs) in IT and computing, and engage in discussion about their practical implementation. Delve into delivery models, employer engagement strategies, and the integral role of industry placements within the T-Level framework. Together, we'll dissect project-based learning methodologies and uncover the intricate links with higher-level apprenticeships.Join us for an engaging discussion as we navigate the dynamic terrain of technical and vocational IT and computing education.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Cybersecurity Careers

    John Lamb & Sarah Zaman , CyberFirst

    The session will focus on the some of the material from the CyberFirst programme from GCHQ. It is designed to identify and nurture talented young people into a cyber security careers. We will look at two KS3 activities based around decryption and online safety.

  • 11:35 - 12:35

    Making Computing Memorable

    Phil Bagge , Hampshire Inspection & Advisory Service

    Join Phil Bagge, Hampshire Computing Inspector / advisor, author of numerous programming books and primary school teacher to explores teacher relevant memory theories. Including examining the research behind retrieval practice and asking can it be used in primary education before proposing methods that we can use in all aspects of primary computing. Where there are still questions to be asked and more research is needed he does not hesitate to outline the limits of our knowledge.

Workshop 3

Choose 1 of the following sessions to attend

These are offered on a first-come first-served basis when signing up for your ticket so get your tickets now to secure your space!

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    VEX Robotics

    Chris Calver , VEX Robotics

    Bring robotics into your primary classroom! Robotics is an excellent way to teach Computing in primary schools, and also incorporates other key subjects such as Maths, Design Technology and Science. This hands-on workshop gives you a chance to try robotics coding lessons for KS1 and KS2.

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    Embracing Excellence in Computing

    Steve Gibson , Gibson Education

    Uncover the secrets to effective staff support in the ever-evolving world of Primary Computing. From managing CPD with finesse to seamless technology distribution and curriculum integration, we’ll look at how to make your passion for computing contagious in even the most reluctant of staff. Discover how to leverage ChatGPT to empower individual CPD effortlessly, elevate your role, enhance collaboration, and become a tech-savvy leader in primary education.

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    Leading Primary Computing

    Phil Wickens , NCCE

    If you are new to the role of subject lead, are due to start leading next academic year, or even if you just want to stay up to date, this is the session for you! Learn where to go for free training and resources, explore the NCCE’s free curriculum and engage in discussion around leading computing. How do we assess computing? What about adaptive teaching, online safety, or enrichment? All these questions and more will be discussed, with clear signposts to CPD, networks of practitioners and resources to help you.

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    Pedagogical approaches for teaching programming using Scratch

    Matt Wimpenney Smith , Oxford Brookes University

    During this workshop, we will explore a range of the different pedagogical approaches that we can use to support the KS2 programming elements of the computing curriculum using Scratch. The Ofsted research review indicated that using these approaches helps support novices in learning programming whilst managing cognitive load.

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    Raising attainment with effective revision

    Craig Sargent & Dave Hilliard , Craig n Dave

    How should students prepare for exams? Research shows there are ineffective, inefficient and efficient techniques. This session from Craig'n'Dave explores what the research says, and how to raise attainment in your classroom with minimal workload based on our 25 years of experience with great results.

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    Computing in Early Years. What works well.  Even Better If...

    Allen Tsui , Willow Brook Primary

    How Computational Thinking is introduced in Early Years including the use of pseudocode techniques

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    What does excellence look like in an AI-enhanced school? Exploring innovation, ethics and good practice

    Laura Knight , Berkhamsted Schools

    This workshop will explore the opportunities and challenges of using artificial intelligence (AI) in education. It will showcase examples of innovative AI applications in schools and provide practical inputs and takeaways about policy and practice. We will also discuss the ethical and social implications of AI, such as privacy, bias, and accountability, and the challenges posed around academic integrity. Participants will learn how to evaluate and implement AI solutions in their own educational contexts, and how to foster a culture of excellence and good practice in an AI-enhanced school.

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    What impact will AI have on girls uptake of computing?

    Rachel Arthur , Teach First

    This workshop is an opportunity to explore the research into the impact that artificial intelligence will have on girls uptake of computing. We will look at the factors that the research says support girls to take computing and Rachel will share her initial findings as to the impact explicitly teaching AI has on the number of girls choosing to study GCSE computer science.

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    Using commercial video games to support children’s learning of programming concepts

    Neil Rickus , UCL & University of Hertfordshire

    During this session, we’ll discuss the benefits and drawbacks of using commercial video games developed for entertainment purposes (e.g. Pac-Man, Super Mario Bros., Space Invaders, Pong, etc) in the classroom, along with examining how video games can support the learning of programming concepts for both primary and secondary aged children. We’ll discuss possible pedagogical approaches and classroom based research related to the implementation of commercial video games to support the learning of programming concepts. We’ll also play a number of commercial video games to identify how certain game mechanics relate to specific programming concepts. Finally, we’ll identify next steps and opportunities for exploring this topic further.

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    Teacher research projects

    Sue Sentance , University of Cambridge

    In this session teachers from around the UK will present on action research projects that they have undertaken in their classrooms over the past year, supported by the TICE2 project. They have some very interesting insights to share that may be very relevant for your own classroom! You may also be interested if you have been thinking about carrying out your own action research project.

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    Teaching programming at KS4 using PRIMM

    Martin Sexton , Academy Transformation Trust

    An overview of our approach to teaching programming throughout KS4 using our PRIMM inspired resources and how we continue to cover programming throughout the remainder of the course. Our approach has helped to improve average score in OCR paper 2 (programming) year on year.

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    What would you like to see in an Oak National Academy Secondary computing curriculum?

    Stuart Davison , Oak National Academy

    This workshop is your chance to let us know what you want from the Oak computing curriculum. It will be an interactive discussion where we listen to your views to help shape what we do. Please bring with you your curriculum opinions and be prepared to share them!

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    A School Escape Room: So much more than just problem solving

    Rob Easton , Folkestone School for Girls

    How could our school improve motivation, active learning, critical thinking, teamwork, and student collaboration after the pandemic? Plus, increase problem solving opportunities? We decided to build our very own school escape room. Join us as we explore our journey of the success of our escape room, sharing practical tips and strategies for designing and facilitating your very own school escape room. The talk will also include a few short video clips demonstrating student engagement, collaboration, teamwork, while problem solving and having fun. We will also share all developed activities along with digital files to help you on your way to construct your very Escape Room in your school.

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    Transition from Blocks to Text with EduBlocks

    Joshua Lowe , Edublocks

    EduBlocks is a free tool that helps anyone learn how to code with text-based languages like Python or HTML using a familiar drag-and-drop blocks system. In this session, you'll have the opportunity to learn about EduBlocks from the team that built it and get hands on by building a project of your own. Additionally, you'll discover how EduBlocks, along with the free curriculum available, can be effectively used in your classroom to make the process of learning text-based programming, specifically Python, easier and more accessible for your students. By the end of this hands-on session, you’ll: Understand the fundamental concepts and features of EduBlocks as a coding education tool. Understand the benefits of using EduBlocks with your students to learn Python. Be able to create Python programs in EduBlocks. Be able to effectively use EduBlocks to meet the specific needs of your students.

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    A-Level CS NEA

    - , OCR & AQA

    Join us for this session where we’ll be joined by OCR & AQA to give an overview of the NEA and allow you to ask questions. The discussion will include the structure of delivery, marking and moderation & suitable ideas for a project.

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    Interactive 3D in the Classroom: Bringing out the Creator in All Students

    Cathy Cheo-Isaacs , Epic Games

    This session will introduce educators to interactive 3D and real-time technology across various industries, including advertising, game development, architecture, engineering, automotive, film, and entertainment. The workshop will share teaching resources using Fortnite Creative, Twinmotion, and Unreal Engine. Educators will leave with an understanding of the suite of Epic Games’ 3D interactive resources and the potential they have to prepare students for real-world skills using industry-standard tools.

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    Can AI be used to mark accurately, fairly and consistently?

    Alex Parry , Raspberry Pi Foundation

    In this session we will explore the use of Large Language Models for evaluating free-text responses to computer science questions. Can an LLM be effectively deployed to achieve the level of assessment provided by an experienced teacher?

  • 14:05 - 15:05

    Understanding the Client Briefs in Creative imedia - and why it matters

    Jennie Eyres , Eyres Training & Media

    The Cambridge National in Creative imedia uses a course structure that is based around the importance of the client, the target audience and the client brief itself. In this workshop we will pickapart some client briefs to understand what is required and why students need to be able to analyse them effectively.

Workshop 4

Choose 1 of the following sessions to attend

These are offered on a first-come first-served basis when signing up for your ticket so get your tickets now to secure your space!

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    What would you like to see in an Oak National Academy Primary computing curriculum?

    Stuart Davison , Oak National Academy

    This workshop is your chance to let us know what you want from the Oak computing curriculum. It will be an interactive discussion where we listen to your views to help shape what we do. Please bring with you your curriculum opinions and be prepared to share them!

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    Pattern Making from Turtle Academy into Scratch

    Claire Griffiths , Aberlour Primary School

    Turtle Academy Coding Playground presents a simple way to introduce pattern-making to young people by the use of simple coding. This type of coding leads well into Scratch 3, where the user can easily apply their turtle academy coding skills to create new and interesting patterns. Educators will be able to have the opportunity to learn how to code in the free Turtle Academy Playground. Rather than being hidden behind coding blocks, the turtle user has to handle text-based coding. This can seem difficult at first but young people embrace the challenge and learn how to code then edit the text within minutes. They can then transfer their new skills into the world of Scratch 3. Their new-built coding confidence to edit and remix their own code is then put into practice in Scratch 3, where they can easily recreate and also create new patterns. Some predictable and some less so. By starting in the text-based coding world they can gain a better understanding of repeat loops, spatial directions e.g.turn right x degrees etc….and even the use of colour in pattern making. This workshop will show that by using both coding platforms the educator can encourage creative instincts while reinforcing some useful maths shapes including the internal angles of regular shapes and possibly some irregular ones.

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    StikBot Animation 

    Steve Robert , ICT In Schools

    Stop-motion animation creation by pupils in a classroom is an engaging way for learners to demonstrate their learning. With Stikbot, creating and sharing animation has never been so easy. The free Stikbot Studio app, allows you and your pupils to take still photos of your subject and then layer them in sequence to create simple animation. With the green screen technology, your animations can take place anywhere you want!

  • 15:10 - 16:00

    Gen AI Tools for Teachers

    Dr Jon Chippindall , Teachmate AI

    Join this hands-on interactive session which starts with a brief history lesson on AI developments, with the aid of chihuahuas and a potato! Jon will then illustrate how gen AI is being deployed in education to support teachers' planning, resource creation and assessment, by showcasing a range of platforms, including TeachMateAI.com - the platform he Co-founded and which now supports over 100,000 teachers worldwide.

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    Empowering Young Minds: AI Conversations and Visuals Custom-Fit for Every Student

    Aidan Weston , Long Road Sixth Form College

    This workshop explores new conversational and visual capabilities in generative AI that can provide more natural and personalised support for neurodiverse and special education needs (SEN) students. By using voice conversations and images, AI systems like ChatGPT and Bing AI can have interactions that feel more human. The goal is to demonstrate how voice conversations enable back-and-forth dialogue similar to human interactions. Additionally, visual references can make abstract concepts more concrete for students through image detection features. Generating images from text can also benefit student comprehension. Attendees will learn how to craft custom voice prompts and upload images that provide explanations and examples tailored to different learning needs. The workshop will provide sample conversations and visual aids to boost understanding and confidence for all students

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    Making the abstract visible: Drawing the flow of control

    Phil Bagge , Hampshire Inspection & Advisory Service

    Phil draws from both his research in writing books such as Teaching Primary Programming with Scratch: Research-Informed Approaches and his up-to-date teaching experience to help explore 'drawing the flow of control in algorithm and programming'. Explaining clearly what the flow of control is and why it is important before sharing practical ways that drawing the flow of control helps teachers identify common misconceptions and correct them. How it can be used by pupils as a debugging tool and used to support assessment. He shares a simple methodology that can be used alongside many of the most common programming languages used in primary and secondary computing science schemes of work. Finally, he outlines the limitations of his exploration and what he is still trying to discover.

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    Primary Computing Clubs - Student Supported Learning

    Mark Campbell , Ada College for Digital Skills

    Benefit from our wealth of experience in creating a Sixth Form Primary Computing Club, dedicated to assisting local primary schools in delivering their Key Stage 2 (KS2) Computing Curriculum. This workshop will leverage five years of invaluable insights gained from running on-site Y12/Y13 Primary Computing Clubs. Gain essential lessons and explore best practices that have emerged from these clubs, with a specific focus on utilising physical computing tools such as MicroBits and Crumble Controllers. The session aims to provide insights into effectively supporting KS2 Year 4 pupils, showcasing the substantial benefits experienced by both primary school students and participating sixth formers. Join us for a practical guide to making a positive impact on local primary education through innovative computing initiatives.

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    Hack the Curriculum Live - inclusive computing resources

    Rebecca Franks & Catherine Elliott , Flip Computing & Sheffield eLearning Service

    Learn about the CAS Include community-created resources that support teachers with inclusion & diversity in computing lessons and how these can be used to develop a greater sense of belonging in the subject. Take part in improving and adding to these resources during the session, for example developing image-supported glossaries or collaborating on culturally-relevant project ideas for creative media units.

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    Feedback literacy and semantic profiling

    Jane Waite , Rasberry Pi

    Feedback literacy includes categorising types of feedback such as telling, guiding, building knowledge and opening up ideas, lists what students need to know about feedback and advises that teacher professional development is needed on feedback literacy, too. In this session, we will introduce you to feedback literacy and how to analyse feedback. The technique we will introduce is semantic profiling. You may have come across semantic profiling before for analysing lessons. But, in this session, we will look more closely at how certain phrases queue into the context or the generalisation (for feedforward and a takeaway learning point). Let's talk about feedback literacy, find out if you do it already, and share ideas for raising the profile of this important skill for ourselves and our students.

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    Ocado resources

    Laura Cumming , Ocado

    Code for Life offers FREE games and resources to help teach programming aspects of the national curriculum to secondary-aged students. We have a suite of lesson plans, editable slides, videos, assessment sheets and worksheets that can be used alongside our two games suitable for KS1-4. Our resources are designed for all teachers including those that don’t have a background in Computer Science, and they are aligned to the English National Curriculum. We don’t hide anything behind a paywall, everything is free to registered teachers and homeschooled students. The first game, Rapid Router starts by introducing the programming concepts of sequence, selection and iteration through block-based coding but ultimately transitions to programming in Python. We start by using a split screen displaying the equivalent Python to show the students how the computer reads the blocks, and what they will need to use. Once this has been understood, the blocks are taken away and pupils code further levels using Python. Throughout all levels, students are presented with both an algorithm and route score to ensure they really work at the efficiency of their solutions. After completing the Python section in Rapid Router, there is our second game, Kurono. This is a multiplayer game where students control their avatars in the same game environment using Python commands. We have 4 planned lessons with worksheets and more in the pipeline. We will also be sharing our brand new Python lessons which go from “Hello World” to iteration, so far. They include some Rapid Router levels but also make use of the Raspberry Pi online code editor for programming lessons in pure Python. We have created free editable lesson plans, presentations and worksheets to support these lessons. This project is currently at Beta stage and we would welcome feedback from teachers and students, should you wish to sign up to trial them. This workshop will be an opportunity to see the tools in action and ask questions about how it could fit in with your teaching.

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    Embracing literacy in the computing curriculum

    Adrienne Tough , St John's Catholic School

    A look at how different literacy strategies can help students access computer science and help fulfil wider school literacy expectations. We will explore a range of strategies including using mnemonics, knowledge organisers, riddles and poetry to help aid student understanding and recall.

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    On-screen assessment for GCSE

    - , Edexcel & OCR

    Join us for this session where we’ll be joined by Edexcel & OCR to talk about on-screen assessment for GCSE. You’ll be able to see what the on-screen assessment looks like and ask any questions you might have.

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    How to level up students’ engagement learning to code with Mission Encodeable

    Harry Wake & Anna Wake , Mission Encodeable

    Both in the KS3 and GCSE computer science lessons, many students find learning to code challenging. Sometimes they struggle with the syntax, but more often than not the reason they find it so hard is because the programs they’re creating are simply boring, and are seemingly irrelevant to students' lives and the wider world. It’s imperative that we shift this perception and inspire students to view coding as a tool for self-expression and solving contemporary societal challenges. This workshop will give you the tools to do this by providing practical insights into making students' coding projects more engaging and meaningful. We’ll explore how to incorporate real-world scenarios into the projects your students are building, including topics such as climate change and space exploration.

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    Empower Your Students: Integrating Abstract Data Structures in Pygame

    Dan Toms , NCCE

    A workshop tailored for A-Level computer science teachers. It focuses on demonstrating the practical applications of abstract data structures through the creation of a simple game using Pygame, a popular Python library. Participants will learn to implement game dynamics such as object movement, collision detection, and will delve into more complex concepts like queues and stacks for adding replay features and managing game elements. This course is designed to equip educators with engaging teaching techniques that connect theoretical computer science concepts with tangible game development experiences.

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    VEX Robotics

    Chris Calver , VEX Robotics

    Our students are natural scientists and engineers that love to question, tinker, experiment and play. Competitive robotics programmes foster these skills and capitalise on the motivational effects of the competition environment to encourage students to push their understanding of not only programming, but also project management, collaboration and critical thinking. This hands-on session shows how you can use competitive robotics in your school.

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    Digit<all> and Coding for Climate Action

    Matt Hewlett , Digit<all>

    Explore the range of resources, workshops and funding available for your school from Digit<all> before getting your hands on some of the micro:bit activities used in our new, free, Coding for Climate Action unit of work.

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    NCCE Support for A-level computer science.. for teachers and students

    Simon Roberts , NCCE

    Find out what's on offer from the NCCE, from teacher CPD and subject knowledge certification to Isaac Computer Science student boosters, curriculum enrichment and free online learning linked to exam specifications.

  • 15:10 - 16:10

    The Future of Fortnite in Education

    Steve Isaacs , Epic Games

    Fortnite Creative is a sandbox environment that allows students to create immersive experiences for any content area. The toolset is expanding with the introduction of LEGOFortnite, an immersive LEGO survival crafting and creative sandbox experience. In addition, Unreal Editor for Fortnite allows creators to bring in content from a variety of sources. This will allow students to develop immersive learning experiences, games, and much more! As we are trying to support students to develop industry standard skills, the future of Fortnite will support the player to creator pipeline while serving as a bridge between Fortnite and Unreal Engine. We have a unique opportunity to bring our students into the creator ecosystem while leveraging their passion and expertise around Fortnite.

Pre-conference catch up 

For anyone staying over the night before the CAS Conference, we are organising a pre-conference catch-up at Ada National College for Digital Skills on Friday 12 July at 5 pm. This will be followed by food and drinks.

If you want to join us, just remember to register for the catch-up when booking your ticket (or email us closer to the date if your plans change!).